Table Top for Four, Please

Sol

At the time this post was written, Sol Rising was signed by a publisher with whom the game is no longer signed. I've updated this post to reflect current information.

I had many good tests of Sol Rising at the Santa Clara Protospiel and I have some ideas for how to really take the game to the next level. One of the coolest ideas is a way to make the game work for 3-4 players. This has come to light in a few ways, some simpler than others.

  • There are proper rules and components to support space brawls (i.e. free to play mode) for 3-4 players in either team or free for all modes.
  • I'm trying to design a mini-campaign (3-6 missions) designed from the start for up to 4 players.

Now, all, some, or none of this might make it into the final version of the game. I want to be clear that in development, things can change.

So, what does it mean to craft a campaign that works with 4 players instead of 2? My immediate thought was to simply add more units. Just make every fight bigger. But, that seemed really boring. Players already have big fights in the 2 player campaign. The last 3 Missions are already large fleet battles that don't need modifications to support 4 players. Teams just divide up ownership, like they would in a big game of X-Wing, and go at it.

We return to the question. How do I make a campaign that is unique and interesting for 4 players? The answer was staring at me from the 2 player campaign. One of my goals for the campaign was to make it highly replayable and make every scenario unique for both players. In most missions, opposing players have divergent objectives. One might want to capture something, whereas the other is simultaneously trying to escort ships to safety. One is on a mission of destruction, whereas the other is trying to bide their time for reinforcements. Each player had a unique perspective and outlook on the mission.

Therefore, the task was simple, at least in thought: give each player in the mission, all 4, a unique perspective. Give every player something special. The hope, then, is that each player has a lot of replayability. "Ooo! I really want to be in command of the landing force next time." Or, "Playing as the station commander looked interesting."

There's a rabbit hole of complexity I can chase, but I think if I frame it from the outset, give myself a box with limits, it'll lead to faster development and stronger, simpler choices.

Fictionally, this will be a separate story that takes place after the events of the campaign in the Jovian belts. At the end of that campaign, the Martian squadron in Neptune departs to reinforce the Jovian fleet, which has left Neptune exposed. Not so much to Terran forces, but to the pirate fleets that raid planets in the outer rim. Unlike Mars and Terra, Neptune doesn't have an official navy per se, but a police force. I'm introduce Fleet Marshal Georgia Ark, who has been tasked to use her limited resources to track down the pirates and put a stop to them. In the absence of Martian fire power, and with the knowledge that they won't return soon, the pirates have grown more aggressive, violent, and greedy.

Within this fiction, I see some opportunities:

  • The pirates should behave differently.What this means right now, I don't know. But, thinking in the spirit of organizations not strictly hierarchical, I see pirates as being more independent, more nimble. I see them having less firepower, but also more tricks. Component wise, my challenge is to do this without adding new cards. I can probably add some cards to help clarify rules, but I'll need to re-use existing ships.
  • The police should behave differently than the fleet. They won't have the same resources as the military. They won't have as much firepower. I want to make Fleet Marshal Ark a crafty character. She knows she has her hands tied. She knows her task is difficult. Thinking like an FBI agent on a stakeout, what can she do to bring down the pirates?
  • Every player should have one Objective. This will be geared towards the Units assigned to them. The Objectives of players on the same team might not always complement each other. This means teams will need to decide where to focus. Or, perhaps really crafty (and lucky) teams can pull off both.
  • If the campaign is shorter, I can experiment with more pronounced persistent effects. It was important in the longer, 12 mission campaign to not completely hose one-side after a single misstep. If the campaign is 12 sessions, and half of them are a foregone conclusion, that's not fun. But if there are only 3-6?
  • Continuing that previous bullet, I can try to really work within a few settings. Perhaps Neptune orbit, a nearby asteroid, and one of Neptune's moons. If I know these are my 3 stages, there could also be a very limited choice structure. Perhaps the cops can say "we're deploying these guys to investigate a lead on the moon." Again, with greater constraints in the setting, I have more flexibility.

The initial process here will be lengthy. It will take time to get the first one right, then the second one as I incorporate new persistent elements and mechanics. But, I imagine like with the first campaign, once I pin down the formula and the system, it's just a matter of work. Write it, script it, test it.

What about this setting excites you? What would you like to see? Your ability to evolve Sol Rising is quite high at this point! We'd love to know what you think.

As you were, Fleet Marshal.

Comments

As you already know, I'm very excited to see this one get completed! It's cool to watch the process of you working with VPG and seeing that it's leading to new, expanded items in Sol's fiction.

As for content in the new scenarios: I'm curious to learn if there is a bigger pirate base that the majority of pirate activity is emanating from, or if they just a collection of independent gangs. Is there a specific resource or condition that the pirates need in order to operate that the Neptunian police can exploit to turn the tide? Or is it Neptune's fate to become the new Tortuga?

This is the type of thing I want to explore. Because it's a smaller campaign, I want to experiment with bigger, more consequential persistent effects. With the 12 mission main campaign, I tried to restrict myself to ripples to make sure every mission was still fun. But here? I wonder if, as you suggest, I can satisfy your curiosity. I'll be bouncing between solving specific pirate scenarios and the grander scheme in the next few weeks.